Posts Tagged ‘1978’

1978 – “Chiritori” Remote Control Vacuum Cleaner by Nintendo – Gunpei Yokoi (Japanese)

nintendo vacuum robot 1979 x640 1978   Chiritori Remote Control Vacuum Cleaner by Nintendo   Gunpei Yokoi (Japanese)

 1978   Chiritori Remote Control Vacuum Cleaner by Nintendo   Gunpei Yokoi (Japanese)

US Patent Information: Publication number US4306329 A

Publication date Dec 22, 1981
Filing date Oct 5, 1979 
Inventors Gunpei Yokoi
Original Assignee Nintendo Co., Ltd.

Self-propelled cleaning device with wireless remote-control

Abstract

A self-propelled cleaning device with wireless remote control includes a body, a driving device on the body for moving the same rotatably about its axis or in a straight line along the underlying ground surface, and a vacuum cleaning device carried on the body with its suction port open to the underside thereof. The cleaning device normally rotates on its axis at a stationary or fixed location on the underlying surface for concentrated spot cleaning of the underlying surface. The wireless remote control is effective to change the operative mode of the cleaning device from stationary rotation to straight-line travel.


See other early remote-controlled and robotic vacuum cleaners and floor scrubbers here.


 

1978 – “Mechanimals” Illustrations – Murray Tinkelmann (American)

Murray Tinkelman mechanimals ulc x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

U&lc.
Illustrated by Murray Tinkelman, December 1979

I love machinery. I love drawings, photographs and diagrams of machinery, particularly diagrams. They look important, they demand respect, and they inspire confidence. How dare anyone doubt that those dotted lines, those beautiful arrows, and the mystically placed little uppercase letters indicate something of great but obscure significance? The blueprint also is a form of visual tyranny. It is yet another kind of icon to be revered by the mechanically sophisticated and looked upon with awe by the mechanically illiterate, such as myself. These drawings are my semi-respectful homage to all the model airplanes that I almost completed, and every printed-in-Japan set of instructions that led me astray. However, most of all, to those passionately sterile drawings and engravings that graced the pages of the dictionaries and encyclopedias of my youth. As far as I am concerned, a Steam-Driven Chameleon, A Tractor-Treaded Rhinoceros, a Diesel-Driven Guppy, and a Propeller-Powered Bass are at least as valid as all that other stuff. These too, are real.

"In this age of depressing social, political and economic events, it is a welcome pleasure to be exposed to the delightful wit of Murray Tinkelman and to sense the love he has for his subject matter. In this case, his subject matter is his Mechanimals, those superbly inventive inventions of his fertile imagination. Tinkelman's mechanical animals are the combined accomplishment of a creative mind and a dexterous hand, two characteristics so often missed in today's so-called 'art' in America. Murray Tinkelman's contributions to the graphic arts lend considerable luster to an already illustrious profession. More power to Murray Tinkelman and his pseudo-technological revolution. Enjoy!"

Quote from Herb Lubalin, former Art Director, U & LC.

Sourced from here.


Diesel Driven Guppy x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

Diesel-Driven Guppy

Motorized Rhino x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

Motorized-Rhino

Tinkleman Treaded Armadillo x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

Treaded Armadillo

Murray Tinkelman mechanimals y1 x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

Murray Tinkelman mechanimals y4 x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

tinkelman illust3 x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Murray Tinkelman's Curiously Creepy Mechanimals
In the 1980 book, "The Illustrations of Murray Tinkelman," the author writes that Murray's "Mechanimals" might have been "built by an obscure inventor who fancied himself a cross between Dr. Frankenstein and Henry Ford."

For his part as that "obscure inventor," Murray said, "I draw them strictly for myself, for sheer enjoyment."

"They give me a chance to grow, to experiment, and to make mistakes. Every artist needs to be able to make mistakes, but there's just no room for error when you're working on commercial assignments."

"They also keep me from stagnating. Since an artist is known for his former work, he can get channelled into repeating the same thing over and over. The Mechanimals help keep me flexible."

The fond memories of what Murray often calls his "misspent youth" have proven to be a wellspring of endless inspiration, fuelling a long and colourful career of cross-hatched creativity.

Murray's Mechanimals first appeared in print in 1979 in (legendary typographic designer) Herb Lubalin's "Upper and Lower Case" magazine. In his intro Murray wrote, "These drawings are my semi-respectful homage to all the model airplanes that I almost completed. Every printed-in-Japan set of instructions that led me astray."

"But most of all to those passionately sterile drawings and engravings that graced the pages of the dictionaries and encyclopedias of my youth."

Above sourced from here.


Loco Motoad x640 1978   Mechanimals Illustrations   Murray Tinkelmann (American)
Loco Motoad

Syracuse Scholar made available to readers a limited edition of Murray Tinkelman's "Rail-Rhode Island Red" and " Iron Ram" offset lithographs of the artist's original ink drawings.


1978 – Pneumatic Inflatable End Effector – Keith Clark (American)

Keith Clark balloon nasa x640 1978   Pneumatic Inflatable End Effector   Keith Clark (American)

Above: Keith Clark demonstrates his design for an innovative end effector which would inflate inside, and so grip, a tubular truss structure.

Back in 1978, another type of end effector under study for the Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) was actually a balloon. The sort of aluminium truss beams proposed for use in space construction are quite fragile, so Keith Clark of NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center has proposed using a balloon that would be inflated inside the beam. As it expanded it would press gently and "grasp" the beam, distributing the load across the beam rather than crushing on one or two points. Such a tool could easily be used to grapple anything that had an opening. The balloon would probably be a bladder coated with Kevlar to protect it against sunlight and punctures.


 1978   Pneumatic Inflatable End Effector   Keith Clark (American)

Pneumatic inflatable end effector Keith H. Clark et al
See full patent here.  
Patent number: 4273505
Filing date: Sep 22, 1978
Issue date: Jun 16, 1981

 1978   Pneumatic Inflatable End Effector   Keith Clark (American)


1978-9 – Mobile Suit Gundam (Fiction) – Yoshiyuki Tomino (Japanese)

mobile suit gundam bandai 1978 9   Mobile Suit Gundam (Fiction)   Yoshiyuki Tomino (Japanese)

Although inspired by Robert Heinlein's "Starship Troopers" that had infantrymen wearing "power suits" that surround their bodies and amplify their movements, most of the Gundam mobile suits were of the "driveable robot" tradition, where operators sat in cockpits and manipulated levers and pedals.

The Gundam concept was developed in 1978, with the TV series first airing in 1979.

Gundam 1978 x640 1978 9   Mobile Suit Gundam (Fiction)   Yoshiyuki Tomino (Japanese)

 1978 9   Mobile Suit Gundam (Fiction)   Yoshiyuki Tomino (Japanese)

gundam sculpture 1978 9   Mobile Suit Gundam (Fiction)   Yoshiyuki Tomino (Japanese)

Mobile Suit Gundam statue erected in Japan.

gundam poster 1978 9   Mobile Suit Gundam (Fiction)   Yoshiyuki Tomino (Japanese)

A Mobile Suit Gundam poster


WHAT'S gundam by Martin Ouelette
From the magazine "MECHA PRESS"

To understand the story and "raison d'etre" behind gundam, one must go back nearly thirty years, to the early 1960's and the start of the Japanese "Giant Robots" animation show tradition, "TetsuYin28" being the first one. The base story being, 99.9% of the time, the struggle for power between good and evil in the style of bad guys attack Tokyo (seemingly the only city on Earth!), killing a scientist in the process. Following that, the son or nephew of the scientist in question climbs into the brand new giant robot (with a suitably noble name, of course!) the dearly departed had just completed (in time for the invasion, it goes without saying!). Then he quite simply saves the world from destruction, while reading the instruction book, nonetheless!
But Yoshiyuki Tomino, an experienced animation director, was convinced that Japanese animation had more to offer. According to Frederik L..Schodt in his introduction to "gundam MS I AWAKENING (the first of a three books series on gundam MS), Tomino was partly inspired by the 1959 novel by Robert Heinlein "Starship Troopers" when he created a brand new approach to the "robot shows" with "gundam Mobile Suit". The Mobile Suit consists of a giant piloted mechanical suit, or exoskeleton, sporting sophisticated armament. In Tomino's viewpoint, mechanical designers had to keep the limits of credibility and the laws of physics in mind while creating the designs. Named "mecha" or "Mobile Suit", these machines looked realistic and didn't have the "principal character" aura the robots before them had. Like the "mecha", the characters created for gundam were much more complex than the ones from the earlier animations. He innovated in introducing characters which couldn't simply be considered good or bad. An example of this being the relationship between Char Aznable and Amuro Rey.
The first "gundam MS" television series, in 1979, did not meet the rating expectations of Tomino at first, but ended up as "the" sensation of the early eighties in Japanese animation.


1978 – “Tee Toddler” Light-seeking Robot – Allen & Rossetti (American)

TeeToddler p1 x640 1978   Tee Toddler Light seeking Robot   Allen & Rossetti (American)

TeeToddler ByteAug78p1 detail x640 1978   Tee Toddler Light seeking Robot   Allen & Rossetti (American)

TeeToddler ByteAug78p3 detail x640 1978   Tee Toddler Light seeking Robot   Allen & Rossetti (American)

TeeToddler ByteAug78p detail x640 1978   Tee Toddler Light seeking Robot   Allen & Rossetti (American)

See article pdf here.

Source: Byte August 1978