Posts Tagged ‘German’

1949 – Space Tug (Illustration) – Klaus Bürgle (German)

Space Tug – 1949

buergle 1949 x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

The above image from a 2010 calendar with Bürgle's illustrations. I don't know if the Space Station illustration was previously published and if so, where? The caption suggests it was unpublished at the time.

buergle 1950 x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

The Space Tugs are being used to hold and manoeuvre large panels during construction.

klaus Buergle Laeng x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

Klaus Bürgle – Image by Tommy Laeng.

The graphic artist Klaus Bürgle created in the fifties and sixties of the last century a rich imagery of the future. The exploration of space was certainly his favorite subject, but many of his images also show futuristic cities and transportation.

Bürgle was born in 1926 in Stuttgart, where he attended from 1948 to 1951, the State Academy of Fine Arts. He was educated by professors Rössing and Schneider. After a year working in a graphic studio he became independent in 1953.

His technical interests soon meant that Bürgle is specialized in technical and scientific subjects and created for a variety of popular science books and magazines cover images and interior illustrations. He also worked for scientific television series.

klaus buergle visionen x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

Bürgle's 2010 Calendar cover.


buergle 1949   Copy x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

Notes: The concept of a man inside a space capsule using manipulator arms largely came into being as a result of the logistics of getting man to the moon and beyond. The Space Station idea was conceived by Konstantin Tsiolkovsky in the early 20th century and then by Hermann Oberth about two decades later. In 1929 Herman Potočnik's The Problem of Space Travel was published, the first to envision a "rotating wheel" space station to create artificial gravity. But how to build a space station? Wernher von Braun was possibly, and probably the first to fully articulate the approach. When Walt Disney wanted to make his Space films (1954), von Braun was his consultant, and von Braun's ideas on construction were visualised in the form of a "bottle suit" with arms.  Von Braun was thinking about space stations in 1952, possibly earlier. I have not read or heard of Tsiolkovsky, Oberth or Potočnik mentioning space tugs or the like.  The earliest idea I've found to date is the illustrator Klaus Bugle, who, in 1949, produced some illustrations on space station construction and showed space tugs with manipulator arms. Was he illustrating von Braun's ideas, or are these his own?


More Bürgle illustrations of interest.

hangar klaus buergle x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

Klaus Buergle hotelim mond x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

buergle gelaendefahrtaufdemmond x640 1949   Space Tug (Illustration)   Klaus Bürgle (German)

A depiction of unmanned moon crawlers originally for the Surveyor program. The crawler on the right-hand side is actually the Sperry luna crawler.

Above image from Hobby magazine no.3 1962.


See other early Space Teleoperators here.

See other early Lunar and Space Robots here.


1926 – Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace) – Fritz Kahn (German-Jew)

Fritz Kahn (1888–1968) was a German-Jewish gynaecologist and science author who developed a sophisticated graphic analogy between anatomy and machinery. His work was widely distributed in Germany until it was banned under the Nazi regime. He continued to publish, relocating to Palestine and Paris before escaping to the USA with the help of Albert Einstein. In a later work from 1943, he describes the relationship between man and machine: “[they] exhibit far-reaching similarities. Both derive their energy from the combustion of carbon, which they obtain from plants. Man, the weaker machine, utilizes fresh plants for fuel, while the locomotive, a stronger machine, uses fossilized plants in the form of coal.”

fritz kahn 1930 poster x640 1926   Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace)   Fritz Kahn (German Jew)

Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace). Stuttgart, 1926. Chromolithograph. National Library of Medicine.

Kahn’s modernist visualization of the digestive and respiratory system as "industrial palace," really a chemical plant, was conceived in a period when the German chemical industry was the world’s most advanced.

fritz kahn graphic 7 x640 1926   Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace)   Fritz Kahn (German Jew)

Early info-graphics of the mind drawing influences from the scientific and artistic movements of the time

Fritz Kahnlg x600 1926   Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace)   Fritz Kahn (German Jew)


man modified fishlock cover x640 1926   Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace)   Fritz Kahn (German Jew)

Cover of David Fishlock's book, Man Modified.

fritz kahn x640 1926   Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace)   Fritz Kahn (German Jew)

Fritz Kahn (1888-1968).
 
There is a new book by Taschen on Kahn, based on an earlier exhibition in 2010. See The Times of Israel article here.

See the timeline on Cyborgs and Bionics here.


 

1950 – N.S.U. Motorcycle Robot Driver – (German)

NSU robot bike 1950 press x640 1950   N.S.U. Motorcycle Robot Driver   (German)ROBOT DRIVER: In Frankfurt, Germany—A motorcycle with a robot driver was one of features of a spring fair. Exhibited by the N.S.U. Motor Company of Neckarsulm, Germany, the robot showed the crowds how to drive the manufacturer's motorcycle. By a system of switches and electromagnets, the robot starts the engine, changes the three gears, drives at top speed for a while and, finally, brings the motorcycle to a stop.

normal nsu roboter x435 1950   N.S.U. Motorcycle Robot Driver   (German)

robot bike 8feb1951 neon x272 1950   N.S.U. Motorcycle Robot Driver   (German)


NSU motorbike robot press 1 1950   N.S.U. Motorcycle Robot Driver   (German)

Another NSU robot.


See the complete list of early Mechanical Men and Robots here.


1910 – Das Moto-Baby – (German)

das moto baby 1910 1910   Das Moto Baby   (German)

Image Source: circusmuseum.nl

Any further information on "Moto-Baby" most welcomed.


See the full list of Fake and Pseudo Automatons and Robots here.

1912 – Moto-Phéno – Willi Schoenen and Friedrich Hirsch (German)

moto pheno 1913 poster x640 1912   Moto Phéno   Willi Schoenen and Friedrich Hirsch (German)

Moto-Phéno die lebende Puppe: Vornehmste, interessanteste Schau der Gegenwart. Auch für Familien. Willi Schoenen gen: Moto-Phéno. Friedrich Hirsch, Impresario. Moto-Phéno, der einzige Mensch, der durch unbeugsame Willenskraft sich selbst hypnotisiert und in der Hypnose eine Puppe imitiert.

Google English translation:

Moto-PHENO the living doll: noblest, most interesting sight of the present. Also for families. Willi Schoenen conditions: Moto-Pheno. Frederick Hirsch, impresario. Moto-Pheno, the only person who hypnotized by indomitable will power itself and in hypnosis mimics a doll.

Above image source: circusmuseum.nl . Poster dated 1913.

monopheno 1912 1912   Moto Phéno   Willi Schoenen and Friedrich Hirsch (German)

Postcard sourced from here.

From the magazine AK VARIETE there is a 1912 issue mentioning Moto Pheno mysteriose.

Any further information on "Moto-Pheno" most welcomed.


Update: 20 July 2013 – Email from Mike Hirsch

Willi Schoenen was a companion to my great-grandfather Friedrich Hirsch and godfather of my grandfather.

Some time ago I started to blog on him (http://motopheno.tumblr.com/) but it is in German …


There was a spate of living automatons appearing over a similar period of time having similar names -see Moto Phroso, Shrozo and Moto Phoso.

See the full list of Fake and Pseudo Automatons and Robots here.