Posts Tagged ‘American’

1918 – Diving Armor – Rudi De Graff (Russian / American)

degraff diving suit 1918 pat x640 1918   Diving Armor   Rudi De Graff (Russian / American)

1918 – Diving Armor by Rudi De Graff.

degraff pat 1918 russian x640 1918   Diving Armor   Rudi De Graff (Russian / American)

Publication number    US1368786 A
Publication type    Grant
Publication date    Feb 15, 1921
Filing date    Jan 12, 1918
Priority date    Jan 12, 1918
Inventors    Rudi De Graff

The invention relates to diving suits designed for service at great depths, one hundred feet or more, and the object of the invention is to provide a metallic suit or armor capable of withstanding successfully the great pressure due to deep submersion, and also permit free movements of the body and limbs of the diver.

Another object is to provide means for supplying air at atmospheric pressure to the interior of the suit, and for removing the vitiated air therefrom through non-collapsible separate conduits.

Another important object is to provide means for insuring the flexible joints of the suit independently against the entrance of water while permitting such joints to move freely.

A further object is to provide a form of universal joint for certain articulations of the suit, to permit movement in all directions while held water-tight by the pressure of the water.

A further object is to provide a form of joint having folding leaves for certain other articulations, constructed to allow free movements of the limbs without cramping.


See other early Underwater Robots here.


1917 – Diving Armor – James F. Long (American)

long armor 1917 pat x640 1917   Diving Armor   James F. Long (American)

1917 – Diving Armor by James F. Long.

long armor 1917 pat 2 x640 1917   Diving Armor   James F. Long (American)

Diving Armor

Publication number    US1305656 A
Publication type    Grant
Publication date    Jun 3, 1919
Filing date    Jan 12, 1917
Inventors    James F. Long

This invention relates to diving armor, and has for one of its objects to provide a device of this character especially adapted to protect the occupant from abnormal pressure when submerged in deep water, and to enable submarine operations and observations to be conducted at unusual depths.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of this character having appliances whereby the operator may move about, and with shields or guards for the arms and hands to enable the latter to be moved so that the operator can perform tasks of various kinds while submerged.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of this character wherein air supplied to the occupant of the device from the outside, or under ordinary atmospheric pressure.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of this character having a tank for oxygen or the like under pressure and with means whereby the occupant of the device can release a sufficient quantity of the oxygen in event of the cutting off of the supply of air from above.


See other early Underwater Robots here.


1880 – Armored Diving Suit – Stephen P. M. Tasker (American)

tasker suit pat 1 1880   Armored Diving Suit   Stephen P. M. Tasker (American)

1880 – Armored Diving Suit by Stephen P. M. Tasker. An interesting pose for a patent drawing. Anyone wanting a Mechanical Man costume would be inspired by this.

tasker suit pat 2 1880   Armored Diving Suit   Stephen P. M. Tasker (American)

Diving Apparatus

Publication number    US236858 A
Publication type    Grant
Publication date    Jan 18, 1881
Filing date    Jun 21, 1880
Inventors    Stephen P. M. Tasker

Heretofore in diving apparatus shaped to the human body it has been difficult to combine with the requisite flexibility of material a rigidity or stiffness sufficient to resist at every portion of the armor the external pressure of the water without re-enforcing or aiding the material of which the apparatus is composed by pumping within it a supply of atmospheric air not only sufficient to ensure life to the diver, but also sufficient to counteract, balance, and resist the external pressure of the water.

The object of my invention is the construction of such an armor, suit, or apparatus as shall overcome this difficulty, and be of itself of sufficient strength to resist at its every portion the external pressures without re-enforcement by an over-supply of internal air, and shall at the same time be of sufficient flexibility to permit the requisite movements of the diver.

It further has for its object a better construction of the armor-lifting devices, whereby the strains in lowering and lifting the apparatus out of the water are not, as heretofore, confined to one portion of the armor, but are distributed more equally over it, so as to act not only upon the head and trunk portions, but also upon the legs, and thereby take from off the joints the strains heretofore imposed upon them in the elevation and lowering of the apparatus.

It further has for its object such an arrangement of the air inlet and exhaust tubes as concentrates them into one and prevents the complexity and entanglement incident to the old arrangements and, further, such a construction of the suit as enables it to be easily put on and taken off; and, finally, such an arrangement of the air-tubes that by the application of suitable floats they are kept continuously elevated and out of the way of the diver.

Tasker soon followed up with another patent, essentially the same but without the metal sections.

Publication number    US237141 A
Publication type    Grant
Publication date    Feb 1, 1881
Filing date    Nov 13, 1880
Inventors    Stephen P. M. Tasker

My invention relates to that class of submarine diving suits or armors which are conformed to the shape of the human body and composed of unjointed sections connected together by flexible joints corresponding to the joints of the body, the unjointed sections being rigid and the joints composed of flat rings covered by flexible material, arranged in bellows structure and united to the contiguous rigid sections.

A diving-armor of the character above referred to was first invented by me, and forms the subject-matter of an application for patent which was executed by me on the 15th day of June, 1880, and filed in the United States Patent Office on the 21st day of June, 1880.

In my former invention the flexible material which formed the bellows portions of the armor extended over the unjointed metallic sections, so as to be practically continuous over the entire suit.

My present invention accords in structure and arrangement of joints with my former invention and it consists in a diving suit or armor conformed to the shape of the human body and composed of unjointed sections of hardened rubber or kindred material and of connecting bellows-joints of pliable rubber or kindred material, the metal sections of my former invention being dispensed with.


See other early Underwater Robots here.


1919 – Diver’s Armored Suit – Victor Campos (Spanish / American)

campos dive suit by jason clark x640 1919   Divers Armored Suit   Victor Campos (Spanish / American)

1919 – Diver's Armored Suit by Victor Campos. Rendering by Jason Clark


campos divers suit pat 1919   Divers Armored Suit   Victor Campos (Spanish / American)

Diver's suit
Publication number    US1414174 A
Publication type    Grant
Publication date    Apr 25, 1922
Filing date    Jul 17, 1919
Priority date    Jul 17, 1919
Inventors    Victor Campos
Original Assignee    Victor Campos

1. A diver's suit of a non-flexible pressure resisting material having members connected with each other by a leak-proof joint, the joint comprising two parts, of which one part is provided with a recess containing a liquid and the other part is provided with a flange fitting into the said recess with its end spaced from the bottom of the recess and bearing against the said liquid.
2. A dlver's suit of non-flexible pressure resisting material having members connected with each other by a joint, the joint comprising two parts of which one is provided with an annular recess containing a liquid, and the other part is provided with an annular flange fitting into the said recess and bearing against the said liquid, the said flange having inner and outer packing rings, and means holding the said flange part in position on the said recessed part and the said parts on the body.
3. In a divers' suit; a body, a limb, and a joint for connecting the limb thereto, said joint consisting of a flanged member having an annular recess-containing a liquid, a flange on the member and fitting in the recess with its end spaced from the bottom of the recess and bearing on the liquid, a retaining ring engaging the flanges of the limb and member, and bolts passing through the ring and flange of the member into the body.


The suit is not known to have been made.


See other early Underwater Robots here.


1917 – Diving Armor Suit – Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

Leavitt dive suit 1917 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

The 1917 version of the Leavitt deep-sea suit.


leavitt pat 1 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

leavitt pat 2 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

Publication number    US1327679 A
Publication type    Grant
Publication date    Jan 13, 1920
Filing date    Jan 15, 1917
Priority date    Jan 15, 1917
Inventors    Leavitt Benjamin F
Original Assignee    Leavitt Diving Armor Company

The invention relates to improvements in diving apparatus and its object is to provide a diving armor designed to permit a diver to descend to depths where the hydrostatic pressure is comparatively great, and which will allow sufficient use and freedom of motion of the limbs, hands and feet to permit working at such depths.

Other objects are to facilitate the assembling and taking apart of the sections comprising the armor; to efficiently protect the electrical connections; to render the supporting cable and electrical connections quick-detachable from the armor; and to provide a safe air supply system that will eliminate hose connections to the surface.

leavitt psaug22 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

life blakeley leavitt x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

The object to the left of the image is Leavitt's other invention, the deep-sea electric lamp. See US patent number US1611651.


Popular Scienceaug1922 leavitt 2 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

Multiple Leavitt suits being manufactured.

Source: Popular Science, August 1922.


PSKR453 leavitt x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

A frontal view of the Leavitt all-metal deep water diving suit. The only connection with the surface is a special steel cable by which the diver is lowered and raised. This cable has in its core a telephone circuit which permits the diver to maintain vocal communications with person on the salvage craft. This particular suit is equipped with heavy rubbers gloves which could be used up to 150 feet. At greater depths the suit would be fitted with pincers or tongs operated from within sleeves of the armor.
Source: here.

The Bridgeport Telegram May 23 1922  Leavitt x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Mar 28 1926 leavitt 2 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Mar 28 1926 leavitt x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)


deep sea 1936 italian 7 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

Source: www.hdsitalia.org


goodman leavitt pewabic 1920 x640 1917   Diving Armor Suit   Benjamin Franklin Leavitt (American)

Diving Armor Suit used in salvaging the Pewabic..

Image and text source: The Sun and The New York Herald,  May 9, 1920.

Only Woman Salvager Regains Riches From Lakes and Sea.

Mrs. Margaret Campbell Goodman

….
Always a Dreamer
"I was always a dreamer," she says, "and I can hardly remember when I first began to dream that there was a fortune in deep sea salvage. The reality came when I became interested in a suit of diving armor. I was one of twenty-six who saw experiments with it, where the inventor demonstrated in Grand Traverse Bay, Michigan. Its possibilities by descending 361 feet and remaining under water forty-five minutes.
"This first deep sea suit had no strut rods. A commercial tube was used that was covered with diving suit cloth and the armored diver was raised and lowered by a manila rope. The armor had a helmet, equipped so the diver was in constant communication with the ship above him, but in this first successful descent the telephone was not detachable and the telephone line was a separate cable. The safety valve was at the bottom of the caustic soda cartridge. Air was not pumped down to the diver, but furnished from a tank and sent in a continuous current after being breathed through the soda cartridge and thus cleansed of carbonic gas. The diver could remain down for the life of this soda cartridge, about an hour.
"The improved armor has strut rods and a special interlocked, tapered, very flexible tube made of copper braided with wire covered with pure gum rubber. The raising cable is of steel with the telephone in the centre, and is connected directly to the helmet. The phone bracket is screwed into the helmet and is detachable. The glasses are one-half-inch smaller than in the first model and the frontal light is tipped to an angle of 30 degrees. The armor is fastened together at the breast and shoulders with bayonet lock and the arm tubes are detachable from the shoulders." ….


See other early Underwater Robots here.