Posts Tagged ‘1962’

1962-3 – The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner – Hanna-Barbera (American)

The Jetsons live in the year 2062 in a futuristic utopia (100 years in the future at the time of the show's debut) of elaborate robotic contraptions, aliens, holograms, and whimsical inventions.

jetsons autovac 1962c 1962 3   The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner   Hanna Barbera (American)

Robotic vacuum cleaner.

 1962 3   The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner   Hanna Barbera (American)

This console activates the washing, ironing, and vacuuming. Antennas imply radio-control. Image source Paleofuture

jetsons robot cleaner vacuum 1962 3   The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner   Hanna Barbera (American)


jetsons rosie sweeping 1962 3   The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner   Hanna Barbera (American)

rosie the robot jetsons vacuum 1962 3   The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner   Hanna Barbera (American)

Rosie with her sweeping and vacuuming attachments.


jetsons vacuum cartoon everett 1985 1962 3   The Jetsons Automatic Vacuum Cleaner   Hanna Barbera (American)

A later 1985 version of an automated vacuum cleaner.


See other early remote-controlled and robotic vacuum cleaners and floor scrubbers here.


1962 – Kirov Robots – (Soviet)

russian robot 62 3 kirov x640 1962   Kirov Robots   (Soviet)

russian robot 62 4 kirov x640 1962   Kirov Robots   (Soviet)

russian robot 62 2 kirov x640 1962   Kirov Robots   (Soviet)

russian robot 62 1 kirov x640 1962   Kirov Robots   (Soviet)

Robots on display at the Regional exhibition of Technical Creativity Pioneers (Kirov, 1962).

Source: Tornado 84


 

1958-62 – “VERSATRAN” Industrial Robot – Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

versatran AMF bw x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

In 1958, the American Machine and Foundry (AMF) Thermatool Corporation (later known as AMF Corporation, later acquired by Prab Company of Michigan)  initiated an R&D project for a Versatile Transfer Machine, or VERSATRAN, a programmable cylindrical coordinate frame robotic arm designed by Harry Johnson and Veljko Milenkovic. AMF introduced Model 102, a continuous-path transfer device, and Model 212, a point-to-point transfer device, in 1962. 

AUTOMATIC HANDLING EQUIPMENT CALLED 'VERSATRAN'.

 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

3243.02 | AUTOMATIC HANDLING EQUIPMENT CALLED 'VERSATRAN'. (1:02:10:00 – 1:05:52:00) 1967
Hatfield, Hertfordshire. Date found in the old record – 23/02/1967.

Various shots of the 'Versatran' – an artificial arm and a hand construction grab which is controlled from large panels. Developed in the USA by American Machine & Foundry Company. The grab is seen picking up a large bobbin and placing it in a box. The control panel can be programmed in advance so the grab can be operated in advance. Demonstration by Mr D C Hall.


versatran point to point x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

versatran continuous path x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

It was only in 1967 that the Tokyo Machinery Trading Co. in  Japan imports and sells the first industrial robot, a Versatran from AMF, Inc.  Britain aquires its first Industrial Robot, a Versatran, in 1967, by Douglas Hall, as seen in the video clip above.  

RISE OF THE ROBOTS by George Sullivan 1971

A second industrial robot arrived upon the scene in 1963. Manufactured by a division of AMF Thermatool, Inc., this robot is called the Versatran ( from versatile transfer ). It is characterized by a sturdy horizontal arm coupled to a six-foot vertical steel column which is mounted on a rectangular base.
Although they [Unimate] are different in appearance, the Versatran robot and the Unimate have many similarities. Both can handle objects weighing over 150 pounds. Both are built to last for forty thousand working hours. They sell for about the same price, approximately $25,000 [1971].

Industrial Robots at Work
Industrial robots do work of every imaginable type. They spray-paint automobile engines and spot-weld auto bodies. They stack brick and pluck hot parts from presses and die-casting machines.
What the robot does depends on its program. With the Versatran robot, there are two types of program controls. One is called point-to-point control and is the type used for relatively simple jobs. The other, for more complex tasks, is called continuous-path program control.
When programming a point-to-point control operation, the arm movements and functions to be performed are first drawn on a piece of paper. Then this sequence of "orders" is translated into electronic signals. Short lengths of metal-tipped wires, known as "patch cords," are inserted into the holes of a small, black pegboard, called a "patchboard," to correspond to the written orders.
The programmed patchboard locks into the robot's console panel. The board's contacts connect with memory-storing and command devices known as "potentiometers." Once the potentiometers have been adjusted for the various arm positions in the cycle, the machine is ready to operate. The robot user may own several patchboards, each programmed for a different job.
Programming the Versatran robot for "continuous path" operation is a matter of "teaching" the machine the proper motions to follow. A switch in the console is set for "program." The operator then leads the robot arm through all the motions it will later assume on its own. Gripper commands are also acted out. These signals are automatically recorded on magnetic tapes within the control console. There are fifteen minutes of program time available on each of the two reels of tape the console contains.
The Unimate is programmed in similar fashion—by moving the robot arm through the desired sequence of operation. The sequence registers in the machine's memory unit. Once the robot arm has been "taught" a program, it will follow the prescribed set of operations over and over.
"There's no mystery to programming," says one user. "It doesn't even require a mechanical background, much less a knowledge of electronics."
The job the robot is programmed to do may involve several individual tasks.

See Harry Johnson and Veljko Milenkovic related US patents US3212649, US3241020 and US3298006.

versatran x x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

Versatran  0001 x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

versatran 0011 x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

versatran 0001 x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

versatran (2) x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

MosherSciAmP2 x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

Veljko Milenkovic x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

See Milenkovic tribute and mention of Versatran development here.


VERSATRAN robot in the 1971 movie "Silent Running"

silent running versatran 3 x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

The "billiard's" playing robot is actually an AMF Versatran industrial robot.

silent running versatran 4 x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

Regarding "Silent Running", for a 1972 movie, the Versatran was still considered a state-of-the-art industrial robot.

Versatran base SR x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

Two interchangeable end-effectors are shown, a gripper for loading/depositing billiard balls, and a pneumatic "cue" to strike the ball (below). The standard two-fingered Versatran gripper picks up a B.A.S.E.(tm) 3-fingered gripped to deposit the balls. Another small continuity error in that when picking up the B.A.S.E.(tm) gripper, the 2 pneumatic lines are not attached, but then magically appear in the next shot (see above).  Also in the above image is the AMF Versatran name/logo, as well as the controller on the left. 

silent running versatran controller x640 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic

The control panel in the background is a real and actual point-to-point Versatran control panel,  used to program the various movie sequences. Although portrayed as "thinking for itself" , this robot would have to be choreographed and programmed via the point-to-point controller.

versatran making of 1958 62   VERSATRAN Industrial Robot   Harry Johnson & Veljko Milenkovic


1962 – “FLEXIMAN” – Anthony Kaye (American)

IR PE 5 63 2 x640 1962   FLEXIMAN   Anthony Kaye (American)

IR PE 5 63 3 x640 1962   FLEXIMAN   Anthony Kaye (American)

Mary Locke getting what robots like to give.


Patent Information:

MECHANISM FOR REMOTE MANIPULATION OF INDUSTRIAL OBJECTS Anthony J. Kaye et al
See full patent details here
Patent number: 3173555
Filing date: Sep 7, 1962
Issue date: Mar 16, 1965

Fleximan Kaye 62 pat x640 1962   FLEXIMAN   Anthony Kaye (American)

This invention relates generally to mechanism for positioning or otherwise manipulating objects, tools and the like in industrial operations, including programmed industrial manipulators. In a preferred form, it comprises mechanism affording duplication of the human arm's manipulative skill in placing physical objects in an infinite number of attitudes •and positions in a three dimensional space and operated and controlled by memory or program devices with which the desired movements of the mechanism may be recorded and then subsequently employed to cause the mechanism to repeat the record movements.
Mechanisms have been devised in the past which simulate certain movements of the human arm and hand, commonly known as remotely controlled handling equipment, programmed manipulators and the like, operating to duplicate the manipulative skill of the human arm in its ability to grasp, rotate, locate, and otherwise manipulate objects and to do this under the constant control of a remotely located person or suitably designed mechanical, electrical or similar memory or programming medium.
It is an object of this invention to apply a new principle to such art of manipulating objects in space, namely the use of one or more mechanical members acting as tension or compression vectors to guide or restrain the lateral movements of an object carrying member, thus enabling the latter member to position an object in space.
Another object is of embody this new principle in a flexible member or arm, guided and restrained by one or more adjustable such vector members, or "tendons," to precisely move one end of the flexible member and an object carried thereby from point to point in space limited only by the size and range of the equipment.
It is a further object of this invention to apply this new principle to a flexible arm which carries a gripping hand and for which a plurality of hand types are provided with the gripping hands being readily interchangeable.
Another object is the provision of such a mechanism operated by 'a single motor unit for achieving three dimensional positioning, as in the assembly of the multiple parts of a product.
Another object is to provide an object handling unit employing this new principle and including mechanisms by which the desired movements of the equipment can be retained and through which the equipment can subsequently automatically, accurately and continually repeat the desired movements.
Other objects and advantages, will become more apparent in the following specification and claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which describe and illustrate certain embodiments of the invention.


1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

Mr Spark Aizawa Malone 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

aizawa robot mag cover 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

Aizawa robots Malone x640 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

Mr. Sparks with his four brothers before Goro was born.Aizawa robots colour x640 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

An earlier picture of Mr. Spark with his brothers.

Jiro Aizawa robot museum p1 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

Mr. Spark (2nd from left) with his brothers in the Nagoya Robot Museum.

The Robot Museum closed 31 September, 2007.

aizawa spark robot restoration 3 x640 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

Mr Spark awaiting a full restoration at the Kanagawa Institute of Technology in Japan.

Aizawa act robot spark 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese)

 


See the full Jiro Aizawa story here Jiro Aizawa with robots x80 1962c – Mr. Spark the Robot – Jiro Aizawa (Japanese).