Archive for the ‘Man Amplifiers’ Category

1974 – Remote-Controlled Manipulator Vehicle – KHG (German)

robot tank khg 0002 x640 1974   Remote Controlled Manipulator Vehicle   KHG (German)

Looking like a military gravedigger or an agricultural battle tank, the KHG Remote-Controlled Manipulator Vehicle was an early West German response to the problems of maintenance and repair in nuclear installations.

kgh remote manipulator x640 1974   Remote Controlled Manipulator Vehicle   KHG (German)

khg remote manipulator press x640 1974   Remote Controlled Manipulator Vehicle   KHG (German)
The Robot That'll Do Anything

A new remote controlled robot has been developed in Germany able to do most any job or cope with any situation. It is called the KGH remote controlled Manipulator Vehicle and has a very impressive array of tools and instruments at its disposal. As well as being equipped with TV cameras and various cutting, drilling, welding, and sawing devices the robot can also collect specimens and measure things. It appraises damage, carries out salvage operations and also mounts and secures things. It can operate in radioactive contaminated areas or areas of high infection, then transmit its findings by means of TV transmitter. In short this all purpose robot, operated remotely or by hand in the control cockpit, is capable of most things and could be of great use in disasters or tasks where danger is high for human beings.
KHG r c manipulator x640 1974   Remote Controlled Manipulator Vehicle   KHG (German)

In this image, the vehicle is called the MF2 made by KFK in Germany [?].


See other early Teleoperators and Industrial Robots here.


1953 – G.E. “O-Man” Manipulator – (American)

ge o man 1953 life 1 Copy x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

1953 – G.E. "O-Man" Manipulator

ge o man 1953 life 5 Copy x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

GE O Man PSMar1954p119 x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

Source: Popular Science, March 1964.

Handyman robot o man x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)
G.E,'s Handyman is seen here mounted under an O-Man.

o man meccanofeb63 x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

Source: Meccano Magazine, February 1963.

Perhaps the world's most powerful mechanical arm was developed several years ago in America. Named "O-Man" (for Overhead-MANipulator), this 15-ton remote-controlled giant makes possible the assembly or dismantling of large machinery by the twist of a knob or the flick of a lever. This mechanical "Tarzan" was built as the answer to the need for a device with several times the lifting power of existing mechanical arms, yet with equal verstility.
By comparison, if a man were as strong as "O-Man" he would be able to carry 5,000 Lb. on his back, lift 3,000 lb. from the floor, hold 1,000 lb. with his arm extended horizontally, or lift and manipulate a piano with is forearm and wrist.
"O-Man's" chief job is to pick up heavy parts, position them and fasten them into place. It can drill and tap holes, use power wrenches, hammers, or riveters, and if need be, can handle a sheet metal saw.
While its grip lacks the flexibility of human fingers, it otherwise posesses the same degree of motion as the human hand and arm, plus the ability to telescope its "forearm" and revolve its wrist.
In a special test, it twisted an iron bar into a corkscrew then tied it into a neat knot. Yet, although not intended for delicate tasks, "O-Man", with its twin steel fingers, can whip up, slice, and serve a cake or pick up and pour a glass of water, so refined can its touch be made.
Resembling a gun turret, the big device operates from a crane bridge, its vertical manoeuvrability ranging from floor level to the height of the crane bridge. Power control is supplied by means of 140 separate wires in multi-festooned cable. The heart of the control mechanism is a system of 8 amplidynes–devices that provide automatic control giving smooth operation and limiting all motions to prevent damage to equipment.

oman press 57 2 x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

oman press 57 4 x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

o man press 57 x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)


GenMills M700 pic x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

General Mills later made the O-Man called Model 700 Manipulator.

GenMills M700 specs2 x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)

GenMills M700 specs x640 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American)


Other GE Manipulators (not CAMS):

PM1950 GE Robot x80 1953   G.E. O Man Manipulator   (American) 1950 – GE Manipulator – Manual or remote control

See other early Teleoperators and Industrial Robots here.


1965 – G.E. Lifting Boom – Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)

GE CAM boom x640 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)

Source: Popular Mechanics, Aug 1965.

Pedipulator 007 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)

Ralph Mosher bending over the Pedipulator. Possibly Ed Ziegler in the background.

G.E. Lifting Boom


Publication number US3333716 A
Publication date Aug 1, 1967
Filing date Dec 28, 1965
Inventor: Edwin E Ziegler
Original Assignee Gen Electric

 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A material handling device having an extensible lifting boom carried by a hoist and carriage and controlled by a handle. The carriage is mounted for rotation about vertical pivots to accomplish azimuth rotation of the boom. The azimuth motor is located in the base of the hoist and the boom is pivoted in the carriage for vertical movement. A hydraulic cylinder mounted between the boom and carriage imparts vertical movement to the boom and an extensible cylinder causes the extensible boom to extend or retract. In each motion there is spatial correspondence between the control element and boom tip and also a diminished force is fed back by lever systems from the boom to the control handle to give feel.

My invention relates to a hydraulically operated boom. This invention relates particularly to a hydraulic boom having return feel and has correspondence of movement between a control handle and the boom in azimuth and elevation. The apparatus will be described particularly in relation to a boom but is understood to be equally adapted to remote control of devices such as guns, power shovels or any other extended member wherein the characteristics of this invention are important.

In the movements of objects, it is a common occurrence that one wishes to move an object under load. When one wishes to move some object against a force of some sort, it is advantageous to have a feel in the control handle or shaft which corresponds to the amount of force put forth in overcoming the resistance to such movement. It is further advantageous if there is a spatial correspondence between the control handle and the object being moved. If both feel and spatial correspondence are present in the apparatus, the operators situation is most analogous to his physically moving the load. In prior art machines where these characteristics are absent, the operator must spend time to learn a new set of relationships between movement and feel of the control handle and the movement of the load.

A chief object of the present invention is to provide a lifting boom having a return feel which is a small portion of the force being exerted and having a spatial correspondence between the boom and the control handle. With my invention, the operator can position the load with deftness and accuracy.

Another object of this invention is to provide a system adaptable to control any device pivoted for universal movement.

Another object is to provide a compact easily controllable system for hoisting loads wherein the operators control movements are the same as he would use in physically moving the load. Thus in an emergency the operators spontaneous reactions are most likely to be correct.

Another object of my invention is to provide a device capable of doing the work of one or more men with corresponding less work and fatigue to the operator.

Another object of this invention is to provide a single control element or actuator for operating a plurality of operating motors in conjunction to accomplish the single purpose of moving an object about a pivot.

These and other objects will be more readily perceived from my description which follows.

Briefly stated, my invention is a control device which operates to move any extended member about a pivot in azimuth or vertically and to change the length of the extended member. The movements of the extended member correspond in direction to the movements of the single control member. In addition, some of the force applied to the extended member is fed to the control member to give it feel. Thus the extended member moves in the direction of motion of the control member and some of the force applied to the extended member is fed to the control member. In this way the operator will know the direction of motion of the extended member and will have an idea of the amount of force being applied to the extended member.


Mosher’s future concepts of his CAMS concept included options for the Boom.

Hardiman spin off 1 x640 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)

Hardiman spin off 2 x640 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)

Hardiman spin off 3 x640 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)


See other GE CAMS here:

GE yes man robot life28may56p125 x80 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)1956- GE Yes Man
Mosher ge handyman Hula x80 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)1958-9- GE Handyman – Ralph Mosher
Pedipulator %20Walker S MFeb63 x80 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)1962 – GE Pedipulator – Ralph Mosher
GE Walking Truck Mosher x80 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)1969 – GE Walking Truck – Ralph Mosher
Man Mate PopSciDec1969 x80 1965   G.E. Lifting Boom   Edwin E Ziegler / Ralph Mosher (American)1969- GE Man-Mate Industrial manipulator

See other early Teleoperators here.


 

1971 – A computer controlled multi-task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients – Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)

University of Wisconsin-Madison Mechanical Engineering Professor Ali Seireg achieved worldwide recognition for his work in mechanical and biomedical engineering design. Among his advances, he was first to develop a mathematical model of the entire human musculoskeletal system that could predict the muscle and joint forces and interactions, given a motion input. In the early 1970s, he performed pioneering research on using powered exoskeletons to help disabled people rehabilitate and walk. Here are a few iterations of Seireg's "walking machines," and his demonstration of their use.

Ali Seireg was the supervising Professor, but the exoskeleton was built by Jack George Grundmann.

seireg1 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)

Source: The Wisconsin Engineer – Volume 77, Number 2 (November 1972)

Everyone Should Walk by Steve Sanborn
grundmann exo 1 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)     
Caption: Jack Grundmann is shown above wearing the walking device he constructed under the guidance of Prof. Seireg of the Mechanical Engineering Department.
During the 1971 Engineering Exposition people on this campus were exposed for the first time to a walking device.  This device was a three legged robot powered by compressed air. Actually it was not a complete robot but only the walking portion, just the legs.
  The mechanism was constructed to be a model, a mechanical analog of a walking human. It could have been built with only two legs rather than three, but since it weighed 260 pounds it would have damaged easily if tipped over. The third leg provided extra stability.
  Since this original prototype was constructed, a new two legged model has been built. The new model differs considerably from the prototype in many respects. The two legged model is powered by AC current rather than compressed air. Unlike the prototype, the present model is actually worn by a human. This was the goal of the design project, to create a device that would give a person that was unable to use his legs, the ability to walk again. The project is by no means completed. More work has to be done in designing and constructing the third model. Presently Jack Grundmann is testing and altering the second model so as to incorporate new ideas into the third mechanism.
As was mentioned, the first prototype was operated with compressed air. This model was consequently bulky and awkward. Model II is operated by what is described as a puppet system. Cables extend from cams, located in a pack, down the body to the individual joints in which they control. The pack is mounted

Grundmann tripedal walker 1 x640 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)

Caption: Shown above is the original three legged walking machine.

seireg2 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)
Caption: This side view shows the long cables extending from the cams in the pack to the joints of the device.

on the shoulder of the person wearing the mechanism. Supports extend from the frame of the mechansim to the pack so that the heavy weight of the device is not felt by the wearer. Within the pack are the six cams that pull the cables causing the person to walk. These cams were designed to cause the joints to move almost exactly the way a normal human moves.
  Ultimately it is desired to make a system that will allow a person that can no longer use his legs to walk forward, backward, turn, sit, stand and walk up and down stairs. Also, the device should be cosmetic. This means that it should be possible to cover the mechanism and its suspension system with normal clothing apparel.
  Model II can only walk forward, Model III will be able to preform all these tasks. Model III will not be supported by bulky metal braces and tubes as were previous models. Instead, plastics and fiberglass will be incorporated as structural supports. To replace the bulky joints, electronic servo mechanisms will be employed. The use of electronics will allow a number of mini-programs to be place in a very small computer, carried by the person using the device. Each program would cause the mechanism to move, initating the motions a human makes. The programs would be turned on and off by the person wearing the device. There would be one program for each sequence of movements such as walking or for sitting.
  Very little has been done in the past three centuries in the area of prosthesis. The plastic leg of today is nothing more than an adaptation of the wooden leg of the seventeenth century. It is unfortunate that the technology of today has not been applied sooner to help paralized people walk again.
  This attempt at the University of Wisconsin College of Engineering requires the encouragement and support of all people concerned with restoring the ability to walk to those who can not.


Mk III

Grundmann exoskeleton mkIII 1 x640 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)

Grundmann exoskeleton mkIII 2 x640 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)

Grundmann exoskeleton mkIII 3 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)


ali seireg portrait 1971   A computer controlled multi task powered exoskeleton for paraplegic patients   Jack George Grundmann / Ali Seireg (American)

Kaiser Chair of Mechanical Engineering Ali Seireg was best known for his research on biomechanics, or treating the human body as a machine. He taught in the College of Engineering for 31 years before his retirement in 1997 and maintained a presence on campus until his death in 2002. He authored seven books and more than 300 papers, edited two journals for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and created a “walking-machine” for paraplegics, which was exhibited at the Seattle World’s Fair and the History of Medicine and Science Museum in London. He was an award-winning educator and internationally recognized engineer.


See other early Teleoperators, Exoskeletons and Industrial Robots here.


1976 – Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis – Pierre Rabischong (French)

exo prosthesis  0002 x640 1976   Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis   Pierre Rabischong (French)

exo prosthesis  x640 1976   Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis   Pierre Rabischong (French)

Corbis 42 17253902 1976   Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis   Pierre Rabischong (French)

Corbis 42 17253903 1976   Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis   Pierre Rabischong (French)

Revolutionizing Techniques of Orthosis and Prosthesis
Professor Pierre Rabischong of the Montpellier Propara Centre watches as a female patient and her physical therapist use a machine developed by Professor Rabischong. This machine allows the patient in rehabilitation to maintain her balance while inciting her muscles to move. The system functions according to the master-slave concept. The physical therapist makes the movements first and the machine transfers them to the patient's machine, who then follows.
Stock Photo ID: 42-17253903
Date Photographed: 01 September 1983
Credit: © Eric Preau/Sygma/Corbis

Rabischong exoskeleton 1 x640 1976   Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis   Pierre Rabischong (French)
Figure 4.4.2.(2) Active modular orthesis for lower limbs (OMAMI) (Rabischong, INSERM, France, 1983): 1 and 2, potentiometers for the master orthesis, worn by the patient; 3 and 4, slave hydraulic actuators for the patient. Contention on the segments is ensured by the presence of inflatable pieces reinforced with strips of composite material (carbon fibre). The hydraulic system was produced by Renault, the orthesis by Aerazure. The kinematic walking model, developed by the Automation and Microelectronics Laboratory, Montpellier (LAMM) is intended to be used and to give the
patient greater autonomy. Photo courtesy of INSERM

4.4.2.2 ASSISTED WALKING
Following on from the work of Tomovic the Yugoslav, Rabischong applied the problem of assistance to those with paralysis of the lower limbs using a motorized orthesis. His original idea (Rabischong et al., 1978; Hill, 1976-1) consisted of controlling the orthesis by unilateral positional servocontrol using two exoskeleton legs worn by the patient [see Figure 4.4.2.(2)]. The second version, currently being used experimentally, is hydraulically powered and was produced by Renault. This system is highly promising for training limbs; the extension towards autonomy on the basis of a kinematic computer model of walking is envisaged in the long term. The patient would use two walking sticks.

Source: Robot Technology – Vol 3a – Teleoperations and Robotics: Evolution and Development by  Jean Vertut and Philippe Coiffet, 1986.


Patent US3993056

Publication number    US3993056 A
Publication date    Nov 23, 1976
Filing date    Jan 21, 1976
Inventors    Pierre Rabischong, Jean Pierre Louis Bel
Original Assignee    Institut National De La Sante Et De La Recherche Medicale

Abstract
An orthopaedic appliance which enables paralytics to stand erect has a fabric garment formed in separate pieces to be tightly wrapped around body parts located between joints the pieces having an inflatable support structures in the form of vertical tubes and devices connecting garment pieces located on opposite sides of a body joint in the form of a separate row of rigid parallel pins attached to the inflatable structure each garment piece and a pivot which can be hydraulically or otherwise driven, interconnecting the rows of pins. The inflatable tubes are located in elongate fabric sheaths and the pins are inserted in fabric sheaths defined between the tube sheaths so that when the tubes are inflated they clamp the pins between them.

 1976   Pneumatic Exoskeleton Prosthesis   Pierre Rabischong (French)
See also later patent US4169467.

See other early Teleoperators, Exoskeletons and Industrial Robots here.